Finite Projections - The Deal of all Sapience

Exhibition held at Galerientage 2019
Curated by Robert Gruber

works by:
Scott Clifford Evans (USA)
Ma Jia (CHN)
Axel Koschier (AT) & Robert Müller (DE)
Florian Schmeiser (AT)
David Tibet / Current 93 (UK)
Martin Vesely (AT)
Arseni Vukov (SVN)
& works from the collection and the collective

Opening 04.05.2019 / 18:00
05.05. - 28.06.2019
Tuesday 11:00 - 13:00
by appointment +43 650 555 9 666

Tour with Markus Waitschacher / 05.05.2019, 14:00



Repetetive Raptus, Nr. 238/241
for gottekorder e.v. Graz
Vienna, April 2019

Finite Projections -
The Deal of all Sapience.


A

Good. We start again from the beginning.
Premises: Dying is not present. Knowing is not action.

We know we could fall into the abyss at any moment, but experience teaches us that it will not be right away
– probably not even tomorrow. Later is more likely.
Always later.

Good. We start again from the beginning.
All. All the time. Inevitably, in spite of all the constant effort, the failure of imagination; evading, avoiding the
expectation – until later, at last.
Knowledge and action are obviously very different, and yet they stand in a kind of connection. That sounds
simple. But is astonishing to the highest degree. What sort of connection is it? A connection in which the one element
always counters the other as its contrast, its failure and non-fulfillment. Assume it is that kind of connection
which we know from good or not so good jokes. It (precisely the relevant connection) consists in this.
Looked at precisely, it is only this connection that makes the joke (funny). That which brings about in
our imagination and expectation the connection between the opponents, alpha and omega, constitutes and establishes
it there – as given reality. Absurd but / and real. Shameful but / and real, disconcerting and real. It is as much
the ambivalence of life as of dying, from the beginning towards the end. How else?
So there we are.
‘We often meet people who defer their personal interests, their health, their opportunity to have children, and devote
their entire lives to an idea that has settled in their brains. [...]. There are many ideas one can die for.’1
(Summum bonum * always leads to alienation and inhumanity. Gracian advises: Do not get mixed up with idiots!2)
Life is nothing but a bunch of experiences that someone / that one, everyone alone and only for himself,
has before he or she is dead.3 Fortunately, dying is the last of these.
The last of something is the absorption of the summa summarum, the fusion of quality and quantity.
A moment of liquidation. The merging, the highlighting of the significant attributes, and equally
the reducing to a common denominator. Predicate and argument collapse with the loss of a reality-endowing equivalence,
a necessity.

The first event, birth – wherever, whenever it precisely begins – is therefore also not relevant, because we cannot
remember it, we don’t remember. There it is again! That funny connection! The character of ambivalence.
Not to remember the first thing we bring into life and not to be able to bring the last thing into life,
but only into death - where all reality expires in any case.
Very funny.
But dying is not present enough. Not present enough to call for it, to demand of it: Stay awhile, you are so ... funny?
Kierkegaard would say (in Either/Or): ‘Kill yourself, and you'll regret it! ...’. 4,
and Kästner: ‘What is the point of ruining oneself and dying in life before death?’ 5
‘God became flesh only once, and in vain will one wait for a repetition of this miracle.
Among the pagans it could happen more often, but only because it was not a true incarnation.
Man is born only once, a repetition is not likely. [....] We welcome the first sign of green,
the first swallow, with a certain solemn joy. The reason, however, lies in the idea that is bound up with it.
That which announces itself in the First is therefore something other than this first thing itself,
the single first swallow.’ 6

The discrepancy of knowing and action.
What is knowing? - What is action?

‘One has spoken long enough of the levity of the time; I think it is high time to speak of its melancholy;
then, I believe, everything will be become clearer. Or is not melancholy the bane of our time?
Does not it sound out of her frivolous laughter? Does it not rob us of the courage to command and
the courage to obey? Does it not rob us of the power of action and the confidence of hope?’ 7
‘The eternal in love is mocked, one holds fast to the temporal, but subtly, in a sensual eternity,
in the eternal moment of an embrace.’ 8

‘Not the gilder, but the worshiper makes the idol.’ 9 But let us not conclude with a joke,
but rather give one to take along (away).
Any one. An affirmation: free will is my best invention. Free will is without a doubt a joke.
The best joke par excellence, because a rational being is a being that conceives of something beyond himself. OK.
At least one has – not yet, but constantly – the freedom of choice (the fear) between a good and a bad joke.
Depending on how one wants to understand it. Whether the glass is really half empty or half full really doesn’t matter!
It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.10 For what the world does not contain cannot be withheld from it.
‘Everybody's world view is and remains an intellectual construction and, moreover, has no demonstrable existence
of its own! This is a bitter pill that rankles many of us.’ 11

Good. We start again from the beginning.
Until we die of it.
But we are working on it.

B
Who is the enjoyer? What is the enjoyed?
Who is the sufferer? What is the suffered? *


1 Daniel Dennet, Den Bann brechen, (Suhrkamp, 2008), 18. All translations of quotations are by Jonathan Uhlaner.
* Note: ‘I believe that ideas such as absolute correctness, absolute precision, definitive truth are fantasies that should not be allowed in any science. [...].
This relaxation of thinking seems to me the greatest blessing that modern science has brought us. It is the belief in one single truth and that one
is its possessor that is the deepest root of all evil in the world.’ Max Born in 1956, Physik im Wandel meiner Zeit, (Vieweg und Sohn, 2012), 265.
2 An allusion to Baltasar Gracian, The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Rule 197: ‘Do not carry fools on your back”.
3 ‘Life is just a bunch of experiences you have until you die. That’ s really it. It’s simple.’ Jeb Corliss, ‘daredevils: the human bird’, interview,
firecracker films, Channel 4 (UK), September 14, 2009. Audio: 00:47:33:00 – 00:47:38:00
4 Søren Kierkegaard. The quotation is possibly incomplete; its source is unknown to the author.
5 Erich Kästner. The quotation is possibly incomplete; its source is unknown to the author.
6 Søren Kierkegaard ( Copenhagen 1843), Entweder-Oder (Holzinger Verlag, 2013), 368.
Note: ‘For happy individuals the first love is at the same time the second, the third, the last; first love has here the determination of eternity;
for the unfortunate individuals, the first love is the moment that bears within itself a determination of the temporal. For the former, love is always
an eternal determination; for latter, something past. So long as happy individuals are not without reflection, they will turn this on the eternal
in love and strengthen love itself; if reflection is turned on the temporal, however, it destroys love. For those who reflect in time, the first kiss,
for example, will be something bygone (as Byron has shown in a short poem); for those who reflect eternally, love will be an eternal possibility.’ Ibid, 369.
7 Ibid., 353.
8 Ibid., 353
9 Baltasar Gracian, Handorakel und Kunst der Weltklugheit, (Verlag C.H.Beck oHG dtv, 2006), 8.
10 Japanese proverb
11 Erwin Schrödinger. The quotation is possibly incomplete; its source is unknown to the author.
‘The framework: that's certainly the way it is! We all believe that today! Unfortunately, it is impossible!’ Erwin Schrödinger,
Unsere Vorstellung von der Materie, audio book, ed. Klaus Sander (Suppose Verlag 2002), CD 1: 00:02:54:00 – 00:03:04:00 (original recording: 1949/1952).

B
* Current 93 (David Michael Bunting / David Tibet), ‘Sleep has his house’, (Great Britain: Durtro, 2000).


Translated by Jonathan Uhlaner


Repetetiver Raptus, Nr. 238/241
für gottekorder e.v. Graz
Wien, April 2019

Finite Projections -
The Deal of all Sapience.


A

Nun gut. Wir fangen wieder von vorne an.
Prämissen: Das Sterben ist nicht gegenwärtig. Wissen ist kein Handeln.
Wir wissen, dass wir jeden Moment in den Abgrund fallen könnten – aber die Erfahrung lehrt uns,
dass es nicht jetzt gleich sein wird – wahrscheinlich nicht einmal morgen. Später ist wahrscheinlicher.
Ständig später.

Nun gut. Wir fangen wieder von vorne an.
Alle. Ständig. Unausweichlich trotz allen ständigen Bemühens dem Scheitern der Vorstellungen; der Erwartung, auszuweichen,
zu entgehen - bis später, zuletzt.
Wissen und Handeln sind offensichtlich sehr verschieden und doch stehen sie in einer Art Zusammenhang. Das klingt einfach.
Ist aber hoch erstaunlich. Was ist denn das für ein Zusammenhang? Der dem Anderen jeweils nur als sein Kontrast,
sein Scheitern und Nicht-erfüllen entgegnet. Anzunehmen, es wäre eine, diese Art von Zusammenhang, wie wir sie aus guten,
oder weniger guten Witzen kennen. Darin ist er (genau dieser Zusammenhang) enthalten. Genau betrachtet ist es nur er,
der den Witz (witzig) macht. Der den Zusammenhang zwischen den Opponenten, alpha und omega in unsere Vorstellung und
Erwartung von Welt bringt, ihn dort einrichtet und konstituiert – als gegebene Wirklichkeit. Absurd aber/und wirklich.
Beschämend aber/und wirklich, befremdlich und wirklich. Er ist ebenso die Ambivalenz von Leben als Sterben,
von Anfang an dem Ende entgegen. Wie sonst?
Na also.
„Wir treffen häufig auf Menschen, die ihre persönlichen Interessen, ihre Gesundheit, ihre Chance,
Kinder zu haben, zurückstellen und ihr ganzes Leben einer Idee widmen, die sich in ihrem Gehirn eingenistet hat. (…)
Es gibt viele Ideen für die man sterben kann."1
(Summum bonum* führt immer in die Entfremdung und Unmenschlichkeit. Gracian rät: Lass dich nicht mit Idioten ein!2)
Dabei ist das Leben nichts anderes als ein Haufen Erfahrungen, die jemand macht/ die man – jeder alleine und nur
für sich - macht, bevor man tot ist.3 Sterben ist erfreulicherweise die letzte davon.
Das Letzte von etwas ist die Summa summarum-Absorption, die Verschmelzung von Qualität und Quantität.
Ein Auflösungsmoment. Das Zusammenfügen, das Herausstreichen der signifikanten Attribute, ebenso das herauskürzen
der Nenner. Prädikat und Argument brechen Zusammen unter dem Verlust einer wirklichkeitsstiftenden Äquivalenz,
einer Notwendigkeit.

An die erste Begebenheit, die Geburt - wo, wann auch immer die genau anfängt? .. ist auch deswegen nicht relevant,
weil wir daran nicht erinnern können, - erinnern wir uns nicht. Da ist er wieder! Der Zusammenhang vom Witzhaften!
Der Charakter der Ambivalenz. Das Erste was wir ins Leben tragen nicht zu erinnern und das Letzte nicht ins Leben
tragen zu können, sondern in den Tod – wo alle Wirklichkeit ohnehin erlischt.
Sehr witzig.
Dabei: Das Sterben ist nicht Gegenwart genug. Nicht Gegenwart genug um nach ihm zu rufen, um ihm abzuverlangen:
Verweile Moment, du bist so … schön witzig?
Kierkegaard würde sagen (in Entweder - Oder): „Bringe dich um, und du wirst es bereuen! ...“4
und Kästner: „Was nützt es dass man sich selbst verdirbt, und vor dem Tod im Leben stirbt?“5
„Gott ist nur einmal Fleisch geworden, und vergebens wird man auf eine Wiederholung dieses Wunders warten.
Im Heidentum konnte es öfter geschehen, aber gerade aus dem Grunde, weil es keine wahre Inkarnation war.
Nur einmal wird der Mensch geboren, eine Wiederholung ist nicht wahrscheinlich. (…)
Das erste Grün, die erste Schwalbe begrüßen wir mit einer gewissen feierlichen Freude.
Der Grund liegt indessen in der Vorstellung, die sich daran knüpft. Es ist also das, was im Ersten sich ankündet,
etwas andres, als dieses Erste selber, die einzelne erste Schwalbe.“6
Die Diskrepanz von Wissen und Handeln.
Was ist Wissen? - was ist Handeln?

„Lange genug hat man von dem Leichtsinn der Zeit gesprochen; ich glaube, es ist hohe Zeit, von der Schwermut
derselben zu sprechen; dann wird sich, wie ich glaube, alles besser klären. Oder ist nicht die Schwermut
der Schaden unsrer Zeit? Klingt sie nicht aus ihrem leichtsinnigen Lachen heraus? raubt sie uns nicht den Mut
zu befehlen und den Mut zu gehorchen? raubt sie uns nicht die Kraft des Handelns und die Zuversicht der Hoffnung?“7
„Das Ewige in der Liebe wird verspottet, das Zeitliche hält man fest, aber raffiniert in einer sinnlichen Ewigkeit,
in dem ewigen Augenblick einer Umarmung.“8

Nun gut. Wir fangen wieder von vorne an.
„Den Götzen macht nicht der Vergolder, sondern der Anbeter“9 - aber schließen wir nicht ab mit einem,
sondern geben ihn uns mit auf den Weg (weg): den Witz.
Irgendeinen. Eine Affirmation: Der freie Wille ist meine beste Erfindung. der freie Wille ist zweifelsfrei ein Witz.
Der beste Witz schlechthin, denn: ein vernünftiges Wesen ist ein Wesen, dass ein jenseits seiner selbst denkt. Ok.
Wenigstens hat man – nicht noch, sondern ständig – die Entscheidungsfreiheit (die Angst) zwischen einem guten
und einem schlechten Witz. Je wie man es auffassen möchte. Ob das Glas wirklich halb leer oder halb voll ist,
ist dabei herzlichst egal!
Es ist besser hoffnungsvoll zu reisen, als anzukommen.10 Denn, was die Welt nicht enthält, kann sie auch
nicht vorenthalten.
„Jedermanns Weltbild ist und bleibt eine geistige Konstruktion und hat darüber hinaus keine nachweisbare
eigene Existenz! Das ist eine bittere Pille, die vielen von uns zu schaffen macht.“11
Nun gut. Wir fangen wieder von vorne an.
Bis wir daran verstorben sind.
Aber wir arbeiten daran.

B
Who is the enjoyer? What is the enjoyed?
Who is the sufferer? What is the suffered? *


1 Daniel Dennet, Den Bann brechen, (Suhrkamp 2008) 18.
* Anmerkung: „Ich glaube dass Ideen wie absolute Richtigkeit, absolute Genauigkeit, endgültige Wahrheit -
Hirngespinste sind, die in keiner Wissenschaft zugelassen werden sollen. (…) Diese Lockerung des Denkens
scheint mir als der größte Segen, den die heutige Wissenschaft uns gebracht hat. Ist doch der Glaube
an eine einzige Wahrheit und deren Besitzer zu sein, die tiefste Wurzel allen Übels auf der Welt.“ Max Born,
1956, Physik im Wandel meiner Zeit, (Vieweg und Sohn, 2012), 265.
2 Anspielung auf Baltasar Gracian, Handorakel und Kunst der Weltklugheit, Regel 197 „Sich keinen Narren
auf den Hals laden“
3 ‘Life is just a bunch of experiences you have until you die. That’ s really it. It’s simple.’
Jeb Corliss, ‘daredevils: the human bird’, Interview, firecracker films, Channel 4 (UK), September 14, 2009.
Audio: 00:47:33:00 – 00:47:38:00
4 Søren Kirkegaard / Herkunft des Zitats unbekannt oder unvollständig
5 Erich Kästner / Herkunft des Zitats unbekannt oder unvollständig
6 Søren Kierkegaard ( Kopenhagen 1843), Entweder-Oder (Holzinger Verlag, 2013), 368.
Anmerkung: „Für die glücklichen Individualitäten ist die erste Liebe zugleich die zweite, die dritte,
die letzte; die erste Liebe hat hier eine Ewigkeitsbestimmung; für die unglücklichen Individualitäten
ist die erste Liebe das Moment, welches eine Bestimmung des Zeitlichen in sich schließt. Für jene ist
die Liebe immer ein Ewigkeitsbestimmung; für diese ein Vergangenes. Sofern die glücklichen Individualitäten
nicht ohne Reflexion sind, wird diese sich gegen das Ewige in der Liebe richten und die Liebe selber stärken;
richtet sich die Reflexion aber auf das Zeitliche, sie zerstören. Dem, der zeitlich reflektiert, wird
der erste Kuß z.B. ein Vergangenes sein (wie Byron es in einem kleinen Gedicht gethan hat), dem,
der ewig reflektiert, wird er eine ewige Möglichkeit sein.“ Ibid, 369.
7 Ibid., 353.
8 Ibid., 353.
9 Baltasar Gracian, Handorakel und Kunst der Weltklugheit, (Verlag C.H.Beck oHG dtv, 2006), 8.
10 Japanisches Sprichwort
11 Erwin Schrödinger / Herkunft des Zitats unbekannt oder unvollständig
„Das Gerüst: so ist es ganz bestimmt! Das glauben wir heute alle! Das ist leider unmöglich!“
Erwin Schrödinger, Unsere Vorstellung von der Materie,Hörbuch, Ed. Klaus Sander (Suppose Verlag 2002),
CD 1: 00:02:54:00 – 00:03:04:00 (Originalaufnahme: 1949/1952).

B
* Current 93 (David Michael Bunting / David Tibet), ‘Sleep has his house’, (Great Britain: Durtro, 2000).


Martin Vesely: Mexico City Federal, 2014 C-print 8x10inch, Eisenrahmen, Passepartout, Museumsglas, 120x150cm / Ve.Schtische, Ve.Schbank, 2008-2015 Eisen, 40x60x78cm

Ma Jia, untitled, metal, 600x63x30 cm, 2019

Scott Clifford Evans, MANIPULATING CURRENCY, Video, 2016

Axel Koschier & Robert Müller, ohne Titel unpolished bronze, glass, 2014 - Freie Sammlung Wien

Current 93 (David Michael Bunting / David Tibet), ‘Sleep has his house’, (Great Britain: Durtro, 2000)